East El Paso Animal Hospital

3370 Wedgewood Drive
El Paso, TX 79925

Monday - Friday:
8:00AM - 7:00PM
Saturday:
8:00AM - 5:00PM
Sunday:
10:00AM - 5:00PM

Canine Nail Care Routine

canine nail care routineDo you have a nail care routine for your canine? In a perfect setting, your dog gets plenty of outdoor exercises and comes home content and ready for sleep each day. Sadly, this isn’t always the case. Our lives are only getting busier, and one of the things we can end up neglecting is our time spent taking our dogs outside. With this lack of understanding comes some problems that wouldn’t occur otherwise.

We want to share with you about your dog’s nail care. This may seem like an unimportant subject, but you will soon learn that it is. Naturally, a dog’s nails are filed down when they run, climb, and dig in an outdoor setting. Now that many dogs are living a life with longer amounts of time spent indoors, it is important to take care of their nails for them to live a happier, more comfortable life. Just how do we take care of their nails? Well, there’s a couple of different ways, so let’s explore them in more detail.

The Basics of Canine Nail Care

The easiest way to take care of their nails is with weekly trimmings. This is similar to humans trimming their finger and toenails, but with a slightly different approach. You will want to purchase dog precise nail trimmers for this procedure, and you might also want to tire your dog out before starting, as some dogs can find nail trimmings stressful. The main difference that you need to watch out for is a quick. A quick is a blood vessel and nerve inside of your dog’s nails which if cut into, will bleed and cause your dog pain. Don’t let this intimidate you. In dogs with clear nails, you can visibly see the quick, and you can trim within two millimeters of it. If your Dog has black nails, you will need to take a little more care, but just be patient and make smaller cuts.

Another option for clipping your dog’s nails is using a Dremel. Not everyone is as comfortable with this method because it can be loud and seem dangerous. In fact, it is very safe. There can even be some excellent benefits to using a Dremel as opposed to clipping. Sometimes dogs that are stressed out about clipping won’t be stressed over using a Dremel. Also, using a Dremel leaves their nails with a nice smooth finish. Dremels are slightly more expensive than nail clippers but can be a good investment if you plan on taking care of your pet’s nails often.

It is critical to take care of your pet’s nails throughout their life. You can do it at home or have a trained professional help you as well. By keeping their nails trimmed, they can have increased comfort and an overall better life. Speak with your veterinarian about the best methods they believe will work for your dog. Happy clipping!